Typical DayTypical Day

Typical Day Typical Day

No Two Days Are The Same, But Here’s
What Could Be A Typical Day:

7:00am    Polar Bears: Water-Ski, Swim, Jogging, Fishing
7:15, 8:15, or 8:30   Reveille w/ guest announcers (depends on day of week and weather)
7:20
7:30 
7:50  
7:55 
Theme Song Of The Day
Fresh Towels & Trivia For The Day
Campus Line-Up
All Camp Flagpole Line-Up
8:00
8:30
8:55
9:00
10:00
Breakfast
Health Call/Clean-up
Inspection
First Period Bugle
Second Period Bugle
11:00
11:20
11:20
11:25
Fruit call & Go to HC Shack for Options
Option Period Bugle
Go to your Option Choice
Morning Option Period
12:25
1:05
2:00
First Call For Lunch (American Pie)
Rest Hour
Afternoon Fruit Call
2:15
3:15
4:15
Fourth Period Bugle
Fifth Period Bugle
Sixth Period Bugle
Lower Camp: Go to General Swim (GS) or Team Practice or Play rehearsal
If cool, no GS, then Afternoon Option Period
Upper Camp: Option Period
5:00
5:50
5:55
6:00
Return to Bunks, Shower Hour
Campus Line-Up
All Camp Line-Up/Flagpole
Dinner
6:45
7:30
9:15
Free Play
Evening Activity
Milk & Cookies
9:30
10-11:00
 
12:00
Taps for Lower Camp
Night Off Staff Dismissed
Upper Camp: Evening Activity Continues,
Under The Lights, Canteen
Depending on day: Back to the bunks for
upper camp in 15 minute increments
Off Duty Staff Curfew
ACA Accredited

ACA Accreditation means that the camp you are considering for your child cares enough to undergo a thorough (over 300 standards) review of its operation – from staff qualifications and training to emergency management. American Camp Association collaborates with experts from The American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Red Cross and other youth service agencies to assure that current practices at the camp reflect the most up-to-date, research-based standards in camp operation. Camps and ACA form a partnership that promotes summers of growth and fun in an environment committed to safety.

ACA helps accredited camps provide:
Healthy, developmentally appropriate and learning experiences and activities;
Discovery through experiential education; Caring, competent role models;
Service to the community and the environment; Opportunities for leadership and personal growth.

Accreditation is voluntary and ACA accreditation assures families that camps have made the commitment to a safe, nurturing environment for their children.

ACA goes beyond basic requirements for health, cleanliness, and food service into specific areas of programming, including camp staff from director throughout counselors, emergency management plans, health care, and management. ACA applies separate standards for activities such as waterfront, adventure and travel.

Parents can (and should) verify the accreditation status of any camp at any time by visiting ACA’s website www.ACAcamps.org or by calling 1-800-428-CAMP.
If the camp you are considering is not ACA accredited, ask WHY NOT?


Camp Towanda is not only accredited by the American Camp Association, but has staff members that serve on the ACA Board of Directors as well as one of their Accreditation Inspectors of other camps. Mitch is a former board member himself, of the ACA as well as a Steering Committee member and speaker at the annual camp association conference. He is actively involved and on the boards of several charitable organizations (SCOPE, L.O.V.E. and VisionWalk) that he gets the campers involved in.

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